My Cuisine PDF

Enter the characters you see below Sorry, we just need to make sure you’re not a robot. This article needs additional citations for verification. Malaysian cuisine consists of cooking traditions and practices found in Malaysia, and reflects the multiethnic makeup of its population. Because Peninsular Malaysia shares a common history with Singapore, it is common to find versions of the same my Cuisine PDF across both sides of the border regardless of place of origin, such as laksa and chicken rice.


Finger food, petits fours, soupes salades, viandes et poissons : plus de 200 recettes pour le quotidien, les apéros et des dîners faciles ou plus chics.

This section does not cite any sources. Chilli peppers are indispensable to Malaysian kitchens, and both fresh and dried chilies are used. Chillies come in several sizes, shapes and even colours. Belacan is essential to Malaysian cooking. It is a type of shrimp paste which is pressed into a block and sun-dried.

In its raw form it has a very pungent smell. Once cooked, the shrimp paste’s aroma and flavour mellows and contributes a depth of flavour to the dish. To prepare belacan for use, one typically wraps a small amount in foil, which is then roasted over a flame or placed into a preheated oven. Malaysian cuisine, and virtually all parts of the plant are used for culinary purposes.

Soy sauce of different varieties is another important ingredient. Light soy sauce contributes its pleasantly salty flavour to a variety of stir-fries, marinades and steamed dishes. In some hawker establishments, freshly sliced or pickled chillies arrive immersed in light soy sauce to be used for dipping. Dark soy sauce is thicker, more intense in flavour and less salty. Young, fresh stems are more desirable as older stems tend to acquire a woody texture: the tender white part closest to the base of the stem is thinly sliced and eaten raw in salads, or pounded with other aromatics to make a rempah. Tofu products, specifically fried tofu, are widely used as cooking ingredients and as side accompaniments. While fried tofu can be bland in flavour on their own, its main contribution is texture and especially with tofu puffs, the ability to soak up the flavour of whatever they are cooked in.

Dried seafood products contribute a savoury depth of flavour to some Malaysian dishes. Small dried anchovies, known as ikan bilis, are very popular. It acquires a very crispy texture when deep-fried, and is served as an accompaniments or prepared as a sambal relish in this capacity. Dried shrimp and salted dried fish are also used in various ways. Plain steamed white rice, to be served with side dishes of meat or vegetables, is typically prepared with an electric rice cooker at home. Some households and food establishments prefer to cook rice on a stove top with the absorption method or the rapid-boil method. Besides the ubiquitous white rice, there are different types of locally grown and imported rice available in the market, and each type has a specific cooking method to bring out optimal results.